Monday 3 June

Overview

8.30 am – 9.20 am
Acknowledgement of country
Official opening of
Engaging Collaborating Empowering 
Reconciliation Action Plan launch
Welcome by SPA and NZSTA Presidents

9.20 am – 10.30 am
MKP | Keynote Address by Professor Susan Rvachew Technology can change everything, or not: The case of ebooks for shared reading

10.30 am – 11.00 am
Morning tea

11.00 am – 12.30 pm
M1A | Acquired communication disorders

M1B |CALD

M1C | Critical care

M1D Clinical education 1

M1E | FULL Navigating the Assessment Pathway: Assessing people with intellectual and developmental disabilities using a decision-tree (W) 

M1F | Speech pathology practice with trans and gender diverse people: A professional practice forum (W)

12.30 pm – 2.00 pm
Lunch (includes poster session)

12.45 pm – 1.45 pm
ML1 | Private Practice lunch meeting

ML2  | NZSTA governance structure and how we are utilising support and advisory groups

2.00 pm – 3.30 pm
M2A Telepractice

M2B | Inequities: Unfair, unjust and immoral (W)

M2C  | I don’t want to eat that! What do you do when your client doesn’t want to follow dysphagia recommendations? (W)

M2D  | Voice

M2E  | Disability 1

M2F  | Keynote Seminar by Professor Susan Rvachew Assessment and treatment of children with severe speech disorders (S) Continues M3F

3.30 pm – 4.00 pm
Afternoon tea

4.00 pm – 5.30 pm
M3A  |  Cognition and communication

M3B  | Justice

M3C  | Dysphagia assessment

M3D  | Clinical education 2

M3E  | Disability 2

M3F  | Keynote Seminar by Professor Susan Rvachew Assessment and treatment of children with severe speech disorders(s) continued from M2F

6.00 pm - 7.00 pm
New Zealand Speech-language Therapists' Association drinks

6.00 pm - 7.30 pm
Speech Pathology Australia: Annual General Meeting and Awards

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8.30 am – 9.20 am

Acknowledgement to Country, Opening address, Reconciliation Action Plan launch and Welcome by Speech Pathology Australia National President Gaenor Dixon and New Zealand Speech-language Therapists' President Annette Rotherham to Engaging Collaborating Empowering 2019 Brisbane

9.20 am – 10.30 am

MKP Keynote Presentation: Technology can change everything, or not: The case of eBooks for shared reading by Professor Susan Rvachew

Well before the onset of formal reading instruction, preschool aged children acquire a foundation of knowledge that supports the acquisition of reading and writing skills. An important context for learning these precursors is shared story book reading. While reading stories to children, adults help children to learn word meanings, make predictions, draw inferences, discern the sound structure of words, and notice aspects of print. Access to these supports prior to school entry has long term impacts on literacy development; therefore speech-language therapists often teach parents and teachers to use shared reading techniques as a means to prevent language and reading delays or augment the effectiveness of speech-language interventions. The growing popularity of ebooks for children has the potential to disrupt or enhance the shared reading experience with uncertain outcomes for the development of children’s emergent literacy skills. A ten year program of research on children’s ebooks will be reviewed. The first set of studies were simple observations of mothers or fathers reading print and ebooks with their children, to reveal parent behaviors and ebook features that support shared reading, as will be illuminated with video demonstrations. The second group of studies employed a randomized controlled cross-over design to examine children’s learning of emergent literacy concepts from print books and ebooks in the context of an in-school volunteer shared reading program. The final studies investigated differences in engagement and learning by boys versus girls in the ebook context. Overall these studies highlight the transactional nature of shared reading. The implications of the transactional approach for speech-language intervention will be discussed.

Disclosure (financial and non-financial): This research was supported by a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

10.30 am – 11.00 am

Morning tea

11.00 am - 12.30 pm

M1A  | Acquired communication disorders

Fidelity to the therapy frontier: What we learnt about treatment in the Very Early Rehabilitation in SpEech (VERSE) Trial (P)
Emily Brogan, Natalie Ciccone, Erin Godecke
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia

A randomised controlled trial of intensive aphasia therapy after acute stroke: The Very Early Rehabilitation for SpEech (VERSE) study
Erin Godecke1,2,3, Beth Armstrong3, Tapan Rai4, Natalie Ciccone3, Miranda Rose1,5, Sandy Middleton2,6, Anne Whitworth7, Audrey Holland8, Fiona Ellery9, Graeme Hankey10, Dominique Cadilhac2,11, Julie Bernhardt2,9
1NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. 4School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 5School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 6St Vincent’s Health Australia, Sydney and Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 7Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia. 8University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. 9Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 10Medical School, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. 11Stroke and Ageing Research, School of Clinical Science at Monash Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

‘Talking Very Early Rehabilitation in SpEech (VERSE)’: An exploration of talk time in very early aphasia rehabilitation (P)
Siobhan Kavanagh, Natalie Ciccone, Emily Brogan, Erin Godecke
Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia

WITHDRAWN: Speech pathologists’ confidence in employing metacognitive treatments for adults with acquired cognitive-communication disorders
Anna Copley1, Rachelle Pitt2, Emma Finch1,3
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Allied Health Research, West Morton Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Ode to Confidence: Poetry groups for dysarthria in MS
Rebecca Balchin1, Deborah Hersh1, Jamaica Grantis2
1Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. 2MSWA, Perth, WA, Australia

Intensive and comprehensive aphasia services: What influences successful implementation?
Megan Trebilcock1, Linda Worrall1, Brooke Ryan1, Kirstine Shrubsole2, Caroline Jagoe3, Nina Simmons-Mackie4, Felicity Bright5, Madeline Cruice6, Madeleine Pritchard6, Guylaine Le Dorze7
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 3Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. 4Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, Louisiana, USA. 5Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. 6City University London, England, United Kingdom. 7Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada

Measuring communication as a core outcome in aphasia trials: Results of the ROMA-2 international consensus meeting (P)
Sarah Wallace1, Linda Worrall1, Tanya Rose1, Guylaine Le Dorze2
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

M1B | CALD

Exploring Korean-English bilingual speech-language pathologists' professional practices with Korean-English bilingual children with speech and language disorders
Jae-Hyun Kim1, Alison Holm2, Peter Roger1
1Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Impact of barriers and facilitators when working with culturally and linguistically diverse families: A comparison between Australia and Hong Kong
Sophie Wing Yan Li1, Natalie Munro2, Sarah Masso2,3, Elise Baker2, Anita Wong1, Stephanie Stokes1, Taiying Lee2
1The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia

Collaborating with interpreters: Training outcomes for speech-language pathologists (P)
Claire Zhang1, Emma Crawford2, Anne Bernard3, Katie Walker-Smith1
1Children's Health Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3QFAB Bioinformatics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Widening the scope of speech and language assessment in children with hearing loss from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
Sharon Hurt , Inge Kaltenbrunn, Alison Gangell, Kylie Chisholm
Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Transcribing Vietnamese: English-speaking speech pathologists’ transcription of child and adult speech
Sharynne McLeod1, Anna Cronin1, Sarah Masso1,2, Ben Pham1
1Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Development of a culturally and linguistically appropriate language assessment tool: The Vietnamese Language Screener (P)
Sarah Verdon1, Averil Ivey2, Ben Phạm3
1Charles Sturt University, Albury, NSW, Australia. 2Speech pathologist, Perth, WA, Australia. 3Ha Noi National University of Education, Hanoi, Vietnam

M1C | Critical care

Evaluation of a simulation-based tracheostomy workshop for speech-language therapists
Anna Miles1, Lucy Greig2, Bianca Jackson1, Melissa Keesing3
1The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. 2The University of Canterbury Rose Centre for Stroke Recovery and Research, Christchurch, New Zealand. 3Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand

Speech pathology workforce in ICU: Results of a national survey
Lara Cardinal1, Amy Freeman-Sanderson2,1, Leanne Togher1
1The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Characteristics of patient communication and prevalence of communication difficulty in the intensive care unit: An observational study
Amy Freeman-Sanderson1,2,3, Kate Morris1,4, Mark Elkins2,5
1Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4Box Hill Hospital, Eastern Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 5CEWD SLHD, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Speech pathology services in ICU: Clinician reported facilitators and barriers (P)
Lara Cardinal1, Amy Freeman-Sanderson1,2, Leanne Togher1
1The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Establishing our role: The introduction of speech language therapy services to a cardiovascular intensive care unit (P)
Naomi McLellan
Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand

Altered airway education for nursing staff across five bed based acute and subacute sites: A speech pathology initiative
Alanna Bowen, Amy Cutcliffe
Monash Health, Clayton, VIC, Australia

Improving services for patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC): Implementation of family and staff education packages in a neurosciences unit (P)
Erin Kelly, Maeve O'Neill
Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

M1D | Clinical Education 1

Speech-language pathology students’ experiences in an outpatient student-led clinic
Michelle McInerney1, Lisa Dent1, Helen Brake2
1Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Blacktown Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Watch or Do? A comparison of standardised patient and video learning for novice students’ self-reported anxiety and clinical preparedness
Donna Thomas, Annie Chan, Nadia Tudberry, Katrina Gott, Alison Purcell
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Piloting the Clinical Learning Framework (CLF) for allied health learners: What were the outcomes and what have we learned? (P)
Nicky Graham
Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, Wondai, QLD, Australia

Development of a clinical education patient feedback tool for students
Jenny Lethlean1, Emma Finch1,2, Nicky Graham3, Cate Fitzgerald3
1Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Allied Health Professions of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Development of written reflective practice abilities in speech-language pathology students across three years of their degree program
Kate Cook1, Cheryl Messick2, Gina Tillard1, Ruth Ramsay1, Megan McAuliffe1
1University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand. 2University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA, USA

Clinical educators’ experiences of supporting struggling students: ‘It was horrible, horrible, it felt just horrible’
Rachel Davenport1,2, Sally Hewat1, Alison Ferguson1, Sue McAllister3, Michelle Lincoln4
1Newcastle University, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. 2La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4The University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia

I don’t think you’re meant to be a speech pathologist but I can’t tell you why
Rachel Davenport1,2, Sally Hewat2, Alison Ferguson2, Sue McAllister3, Michelle Lincoln4
1La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Newcastle University, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. 3The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4The University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia

FULL M1E Navigating the assessment pathway: Assessing people with intellectual and developmental disabilities using a decision-tree (W)
Andy Smidt, Aylin Huzmeli, Ayla Links, Sook Mun Hannah Leong
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Assessing a person with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) is complex and involves a specific set of skills. Assessment needs to identify functionally relevant goals and focus on outcomes that allow the person to participate in their everyday life.  Standardised tools are not appropriate due to the heterogeneity of the population and assessment outcomes need to identify a range of intervention targets. To assess a person with complex communication needs (CCN), we need to collaborate with a range of communication partners.

There is a plethora of available assessment tools for people with CCN who have a IDD. These include informant report, structured observation and dynamic assessment protocols- which assess the communication levels and needs of the individual. Communication may be intentional or unintentional, use conventional or unconventional signals and include a range of behaviours that need to be interpreted by communication partners (CPs). These communication behaviours will likely vary in different contexts and with different partners. Thus, optimal assessments need to take place in natural contexts, and include multiple environments and CPs.   Moreover, the outcomes of an assessment need to do more than just state a person’s intentionality or level of symbolic understanding. It needs to give practitioners a representative enough understanding of the individual within his or her context, to formulate functionally meaningful goals that empower successful communication.

This workshop will take participants through the process of assessing a person with CCN and identify suitable tools for people who have different levels of communication.

Introduction/rationale: Given the roll-out of the NDIS, more clinicians in Australia are working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Where previously clients would be seen by organisations that are dedicated to providing services to those with a disability, currently practitioners working in private practice or for a non-government organisation that does not have a disability focus, are providing assessment and intervention for those with a disability.

Objectives: This workshop will take participants through the process of assessing a person with CCN and identifying suitable tools for people who have different levels of communication. This workshop will be practical and interactive.Participants will be empowered to engage in ecologically relevant observational assessment, form functional goals and collaborate with a range of communication partners. In so doing, they will gain skills they can utilise in clinical practice.

Results or practice implications: This workshop will support clinicians to be able to assess people with intellectual disabilities using a range of different available tools including informant report, structured observation and dynamic assessment protocols. Outcomes of an assessment need to do more than just state a person’s intentionality or level of symbolic understanding. It needs to give clinicians a representative enough understanding of the individual within his or her context, to formulate functionally meaningful goals that empower successful communication.

Learning outcomes: Participants will be given a decision tree to support clinical reasoning about which tools are appropriate for which kind of communicator.  They will become familiar with several of the currently used assessment tools.  By analysing communication in the session, they will be able to identify the strengths and limitations of each tool as well as selecting the appropriate tools for each individual. Participants will need to bring a laptop computer to the session, but all other material will be provided.

Conclusion: This workshop will be practical and interactive.  Participants will be empowered to engage in ecologically relevant observational assessment, form functional goals and collaborate with a range of communication partners. In so doing, they will gain skills they can utilise in clinical practice.

Attendance number: 80

M1F  | Speech pathology practice with trans and gender diverse people: A professional practice forum (W)
Jennifer Oates1, Georgia Dacakis1, David Azul2, Sterling Quinn1, Emma Ball3,4
1La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC, Australia. 3Voice Clinic and Transgender Voice and Communication service in the La Trobe University Communication Clinic, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 4Monash Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 

Trans and gender diverse people are those who do not identify with the gender assigned to them at birth. For many members of this population, being able to identify with their voice and to successfully communicate the gender to which they feel they belong is critical to their social integration, psychosocial and financial wellbeing, personal safety, and quality of life. Many trans and gender diverse people therefore seek support from speech pathologists to mitigate their gender-related communication problems. In the past 15 years there has been a rapid increase in the number of trans and gender diverse people requesting health care, a substantial increase in demand for speech pathology services from this group and a steady improvement in the evidence for the effectiveness of voice and communication training for these people. This forum aims to identify key clinical and professional issues for speech pathologists working in this emerging area of practice. The presenters and an invited panel will provide an overview of current knowledge relevant to voice and communication training for trans and gender diverse people and an outline of current professional practice issues related to speech pathology practice in this field. Much of this forum will, however, be devoted to canvassing perspectives of forum participants around interest in working in this emerging area of practice, the competencies required for practice, barriers to practice in this field, and entry-level education and professional development initiatives that would be required to increase the number of speech pathologists providing services to this population. 

Introduction/rationale: Despite increases in demand for speech pathology services from trans and gender diverse people and evidence demonstrating effectiveness of voice and communication training for these individuals, services for this population are scarce. Education of speech pathologists rarely addresses knowledge, skills and competencies required for practice in this field. Opportunities for clinicians to acquire competence in this area are limited and no clinical guidelines are available to guide speech pathologists wishing to work with trans and gender diverse clients.

Objectives: This workshop aims to provide an overview of current knowledge relevant to voice and communication training for trans and gender diverse people. The workshop also aims to canvas perspectives of forum participants around interest in working with trans and gender diverse clients, the competencies required for practice in this emerging field, barriers to practice in this area, and entry-level education and professional development initiatives that would be required to increase the number of speech pathologists providing services to this population.

Results or practice implications: The insights gained through this forum are likely to be of value to agencies involved in education and training of speech pathologists and in the delivery of health care for trans and gender diverse people (e.g., Speech Pathology Australia, state and federal departments of health, universities, and community organisations such as the Australia and New Zealand Professional Association for Transgender Health, community health services and private practices).

Learning outcomes: Participants will increase their understanding of contemporary and evidence-based voice and communication training for trans and gender diverse people and of current professional practice issues related to speech pathology education and practice in this field. 

Conclusion: Insights gained from this workshop will be valuable for a range of organisations involved in education and training of speech pathologists, for agencies involved in the delivery of inclusive health care, and for speech pathologists interested in providing services to trans and gender diverse people.

Attendance number: 80

12.30 pm – 2.00 pm

Lunch (including Poster session: 12.45pm – 1.45pm)

12.45 pm – 1.45 pm

ML1  | Private Practice lunchtime presentation
Members working in private practice are invited to meet with Nichola Harris (SPA’s Senior Advisor, Professional Practice), Erin West (SPA’s NDIS/Practice and Clinical Support Advisor) and Anna Pannuzzo (WorkPlacePLUS). Nichola will provide an update about resources for private providers from National Office. Anna will provide members with information about all matters to do with employment including awards, contracts and all matters HR.

ML2 | Engaging, collaborating and empowering consumers, membership and mentors in the New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association (NZSTA) Governance
Annette Rotherham1, Anna Miles2, Claire WInward3, Renee Taylor2, Jodi White4
1NZSTA, Rotorua, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand. 2NZSTA, Auckland, New Zealand. 3NZSTA, Wellington, New Zealand. 4NZSTA, Palmerston North, Manawatu, New Zealand

Background: NZSTA has traditionally worked with member subgroups who support our obligations and vision. More recently, advisory groups have been introduced to enhance NZSTA governance and provide direction for meaningful advocacy for members and our communities.

Aim(s): NZSTA will provide an overview of three advisory groups that assist our strategic direction.

Method: NZSTA has traditionally worked with member subgroups who support our obligations and vision: Ethics, Area and Practice Representatives, Conference Program, and Program Accreditation Committees. More recently, advisory groups have been introduced to enhance NZSTA governance and advocate for members and our communities.

Result(s): The Consumer Focus Group, led by Geneva Hakaria Tino (a consumer and AAC user), is a group that engages with a range of service users and family members to provide insight into the lived experiences of communication difficulties. This group guides NZSTA in the key issues of consumers in Aotearoa on how members can advocate and support their communities.

He Kete Whanaungatanga is a Rōpū/group of Māori and non-Māori SLTs who collectively guide the Association. The goal is to have He Kete assists NZSTA projects from inception through to completion to ensure a bi-cultural and equitable lens is present.

The Expert Adviser Group has a role providing advice and guidance of best practice and professional development for members. They are called upon for their evidence-based opinions on matters that arise from media, public and government enquiries and contribute to Parliamentary submissions.

Conclusion: This collaborative presentation will involve representatives from NZSTA Board and advisory groups.

2.00 pm - 3.30 pm

M2A | Telepractice

Enhancing the provision of family-centred services in early intervention for children with hearing loss: An investigation of Australian telepractice models
Nerina Scarinci1,2, Monique Waite1,2, Jenny Atkins1,2, Carly Meyer1,2, Emma Rushbrooke3, Katie Ekberg1, Louise Hickson1,2, Robert Cowan2
1The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 2HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3Hear and Say Centre for Deaf Children, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Telerehabilitation and intensive dysarthria treatment: A means of optimising service delivery and functional speech outcomes?
Brooke-Mai Whelan1, Louise Cahill1, Deborah Theodoros1
1RECOVER Injury Research Centre, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Development of the system architecture for conducting paediatric feeding assessments via telepractice
Madeline Raatz1,2, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Jeanne Marshall1,2, Clare Burns2,4
1Speech Pathology Department, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Speech Pathology Department, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Paediatric feeding services via telepractice: The consumer perspective (P)
Madeline Raatz1,2, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Jeanne Marshall2,1
1Speech Pathology Department, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Delivering community-based clinical services to individuals with an acquired brain injury via telerehabilitation
Tamara Ownsworth1, Deboroah Theodoros2, Louise Cahill2, Atiyeh Vaezipour2, Ray Quinn3,4, Melissa Kendall3,4, Karen Lucas5
1Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2RECOVER Injury Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3The Hopkins Centre, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 5Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Remediation of cognitive-communication disorders (CCDs) following acquired brain injury (ABI) using telerehabilitation (P)
Anna Copley1, Louise Cahill 2, Emma Finch1,3, Jenny Fleming1, Petrea Cornwell4, Deborah Theodoros1,2
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2RECOVER Injury Research Centre, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Heading home: The implementation of early intensive aphasia rehabilitation via telehealth
Claire Hession, Alisha Dicton, Wendy Comben
The Townsville Hospital, Townsville, QLD, Australia

M2B | Inequities: Unfair, unjust and immoral (W)
Tane Taylor
Auckland, New Zealand

As health professionals and health providers we are confronted daily with the notion of inequities. However, addressing these seem to be more complex and unachievable. This interactive workshop will explore these issues especially from an indigenous minority groups world view.

Introduction/rationale: Health funding presently incentives caring for those with the least health need – there are rarely consequences of services that do not deliver for Maori or other indigenous populations – we keep spending more on healthcare whilst ignoring the other things that other people need for health – there is no authentic power sharing by whites – and we shy away from discussions of privilege or racism.

Objectives: Create a safe environment to explore how inequities impact on our daily lives. To consider other models of healthcare that maybe useful for our populations.

Results or practice implications:  The workshop may discover/highlight specific practical aspects that attendees may take back to their respective practices.

Learning outcomes:  To be more comfortable with engaging and discussing issues around inequities, and sharing positive experiences.

Conclusion:  The landing is uncertain. The workshop is more interested in the process of engagement and sharing of ideas and opinions.

Attendance number: 80

M2C | I don't want to eat that! What do you do when your client doesn't want to follow dysphagia recommendations? (W)
Kym Torresi1, Trish Johnson1, .Michelle Bennet2, Amanda Dansky3, Danica Dalton4, .Jill Ensor5, Chyrisse Heine6, Wendy Pearce7, Gail Rogers8, Pamela Windram9
1Speech Pathology Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3Amanda Heyer Speech Pathology, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 4Link Health and Community, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 5Dr Jill Ensor & Associates Speech Pathology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 6LaTrobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 7Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 8Specialised Speech Services, Cairns, QLD, Australia. 9Hall & Prior Aged Care Group, Perth, WA, Australia

This workshop will focus on the ethical dilemmas faced by speech pathologists when there may be opposing views with regards to dysphagia management and following of speech pathology recommendations. Using case presentations highlighting key issues and interactive discussion, workshop participants will be engaged to explore themes and current practices around key areas including

  •   What do you do when your client doesn’t want to follow the speech pathology recommendations, or when client choice in this area is challenged by organisational policies?
  •   What are your professional and legal obligations in this area?
  •   How can a speech pathologist work to balance dignity of risk and meet requirements under the new Aged Care Standards?

It will also feature a panel discussion exploring key issues including the role of the speech pathologist, legal perspectives and implications of 'risk feeding' and focus on quality of life. This workshop will be an important opportunity for members to contribute to the planned SPA Position Statement to be developed in this area. Whilst presented by SPA's Aged Care Working Party, it will have direct relevance and benefits to speech pathologists working across a range of sectors and workplaces, including aged care, health, education and disability sectors. 

Introduction/rationale: Speech pathologists frequently face the ethical dilemma of a client wishing to make different decisions to those proposed as part of speech pathology recommendations for dysphagia managementMany member enquiries to SPA request support and advice regarding their professional and legal obligations in this area. Speech Pathology Australia is subsequently currently developing a Position Statement on this topic, and this workshop will provide a valuable opportunity for members across sectors to also contribute their practices and issues for this statement.

Objectives: Participants will;

  • Reflect on their own, and others’ practices in situations where an individual does not want to follow dysphagia recommendations
  • Reflect on what the role of the speech pathologist is in dysphagia management, and how this interacts with respecting client choice and autonomy
  • Understand their professional and legal responsibilities in dysphagia management
  • Discuss issues around and solutions for potential conflict situations
  • Contribute information to be used by SPA in determining content need for the Position Statement under development 

Results or practice implications: Participants will have the opportunity to engage in discussions and broaden their understanding of current practices across the profession and recommended best practice approaches. Discussion during this workshop will help to inform the required contents of the planned SPA Position Statement on Choice, Control and Dysphagia.

Learning outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to develop a tailored action plan for their context and identify key topics for SPA to provide resources and ongoing support.

Conclusion: This workshop will provide opportunity to discuss challenges faced by speech pathologists working with clients with dysphagia in a variety of contexts, and approaches that can be used in those situations.

Attendance number: Unlimited

M2D | Voice

What happens in voice therapy? Analysis of gestural communication
Clare Eastwood, Cate Madill, Patricia McCabe
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Outcomes of traditional voice therapy with cognitive therapy versus traditional voice therapy for management of functional voice disorders: A systematic review
Heidi Gray1, Leah Coman1, Chloe Walton1, Sarah Thorning2, Elizabeth Cardell3, Kelly Weir3,4
1Speech Pathology Department of Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 2Research and Training Department of Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 3School of Allied Health Sciences and Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 4Allied Health Clinical Governance, Education and Research, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia

Vocal fry in vocally-healthy speakers: What does the evidence say? (P)
Katherine Dallaston, Gerry Docherty
Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

What help speech-language pathology students to become competent clinicians in the field of voice? An investigation of students' perceptions
Katherine Dallaston, Anna Rumbach, Anne Hill
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Speech pathology students' perceptions of a standardised patient clinic for assessment and management of voice disorders
Anna Rumbach, Danielle Aldridge, Anne Hill
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

M2E | Disability 1

A profile of people with communication disability in Australia from the 2015 ABS Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers
Beatrix Forrest, Lucy McCrossen
Australian Bureau of Statistics, Canberra, ACT, Australia

An integrative review of health literacy demands of speech pathology reports on people with communication disability: Implications for inclusive practices
Harmony Turnbull1, Leigha Dark2, Ian Skinner1, Bronwn Hemsley1
1The University of Technology, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Creating communication access in our communities: The trials and triumphs of engaging and empowering mainstream partners
Katie Lyon, Barbara Solarsh, Hilary Johnson, Denise West
Scope (Australia), Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Engaging Victoria Police to empower uniform police officers to provide communication accessible services
Georgia Burn1, Denise West1, Hilary Johnson1, Katie Lyon1, Mark Nichols2
1Scope (Australia), Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Victoria Police, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Current practices in delivery of communication services to children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)
Victoria Sandham
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

M2F | Assessment and treatment of children with severe speech sound disorders (S) – Continues M3F
Susan Rvachew
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Using data from young patients with complex needs a tutorial in the administration and scoring of the Syllable Repetition Task (SRT) will be provided. Interpretation of SRT results in the context of other assessment results will also be discussed in relation to the diagnosis of phonological versus motor planning disorder. Specifically, a phonological planning disorder will be described as a deficit in the process of retrieving phonological units and assembling a phonological plan that is revealed by inconsistent within word productions that resemble phonemic paraphasias occurring alongside inaccurate repetition of longer versus shorter nonwords (i.e., poor phonological memory as revealed by the Syllable Repetition Task). In contrast, a motor planning disorder will be described as a deficit in the process of coordinating the temporal and spatial coordinates of multiple articulators to produce speech sounds with dynamic stability. It is revealed by an inability to produce new segment and syllable combinations at the expected rate and consistency. On the Syllable Repetition Task it is revealed by segment insertions, usually at syllable boundaries. Subsequently details of treatment procedures that can be used to treat these two types of planning deficit will be described and supported with video demonstrations and research evidence.

Introduction/rationale: Children with the most severe speech sound disorders often present with inconsistent speech sound disorders, within phonemes and words. These children present a challenge for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. In this seminar a theoretical framework and assessment tool proposed by Shriberg and colleagues will be presented to support differentiation of the primary area of need for children with inconsistent errors, typical in the domain of phonological versus motor planning.

Objectives: The objectives of this seminar are to provide a tutorial on the diagnosis and treatment of phonological planning versus motor planning disorder using case studies, video demonstrations and research evidence.

Results or practice implications: When speech-language interventions are properly targeted at the child's underlying psychololinguistic deficits, learning as measured by generalisation and retention is enhanced. This session will help clinicians implement assessment procedures to identify the cognitive-linguistic processes that underly the child's speech disorder in order to select and target intervention procedures more effectively.

Learning outcomes: Participants will learn to;

  1. Administer and score the Syllable Repetition Task
  2. Interpret assessment data to differentiate phonological from motor planning disorders.
  3. Recognise prepractice procedures that could be used for the treatment of phonological versus motor planning disorder.
  4. Modify treatment activities to increase treatment intensity (dose) during sessions.

Conclusion: The results of an N-of-1 single subject randomised controlled trial will also be presented to support the diagnostic framework and treatment recommendations that will be presented.

Disclosure (financial and non-financial): This research was supported with funds from the Ruth Ratner Miller Foundation and the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America.

Attendance number: Unlimited

3.30 pm– 4.00 pm

Afternoon tea

4.00 pm - 5.30 pm

M3A | Cognition and communication

Measuring conversations in dementia discourse: An adaptation of the Kagan rating scales
Zaneta Mok1, Cailey Russell1, Gillian Steel2, Erin Conway3
1Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Paediatric cognitive-communication disorders: Exploring current assessment practices following traumatic brain injury (P)
Lauren Crumlish, Anna Copley, Tanya Rose
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Discourse and cognition in speakers with acquired brain injury: A systematic review (P)
Elizabeth Hill, Mary Claessen, Anne Whitworth, Mark Boyes, Roslyn Ward
Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia

Exploring how the introduction of reperfusion therapies is changing the presentation of cognitive-communication skills in our patients following ischaemic stroke (P)
Victoria Jones1, Emma Finch2,3,4, Anna Copley1
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Speech pathology in the memory clinic: Lessons from a new service
Karen Makkai1, Christine O'Connell1,2
1Queensland Health, Toowoomba, QLD, Australia. 2Southern Queensland Rural Health, Toowoomba, QLD, Australia

Developing an evidence-based intervention for reading deficits after ABI: Pilot results
Kerrin Watter1,2,3, Emma Finch4,2,3, Anna Copley2
1ABI TRS, PA Hospital, Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Speech Pathology Dept, PA Hospital, Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

‘I remember when…’: The impact of reminiscence therapy on discourse production in older adults with cognitive impairment
Naomi Rose1, Anne Whitworth1, Sharon Smart1, Elizabeth Oliver2, Jade Cartwright1
1Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia. 2Catholic Homes Inc., Perth, WA, Australia

Exploring NARNIA in traumatic brain injury: A direct discourse intervention study to explore language, cognition and psychosocial recovery
Naomi Ng1, Anne Whitworth1, Lydia Timms1, Emma Power2
1Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia. 2The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

M3B  | Justice

Empowering voices to be heard in youth justice contexts: Wisdom from young people
Sally Kedge, Alayne McKee
Talking Trouble Aotearoa NZ, Auckland, New Zealand

The role of speech-language pathology in Queensland Youth Justice system, including an overview of modifying written information for young people
Stella Martin1, Chris Morris1, Lauren Lacey1, Ashlee O'Neill1, Hannah Fryer2, Kerry Hunt2
1Youth Justice, Queensland Government, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Youth Justice, Queensland Government, Townsville, QLD, Australia

How to develop documents to be understood by young people with communication difficulties in youth justice settings
Stella Martin1, Chris Morris1, Lauren Lacey1, Ashlee O'Neill1, Hannah Fryer2, Kerry Hunt2
1Youth Justice, Queensland Government, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Youth Justice, Queensland Government, Townsville, QLD, Australia

Speech-language pathology cross government collaboration in youth justice
Paula Hartwig1, Stella Martin2, Ashlee O'Neill2, Lauren Lacey2, Lyndal Foy1
1Department of Education, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Youth Justice, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

WITHDRAWN - Speech-language pathology practice in a youth justice school: New frontiers in the education-health-justice nexus
Nathaniel Swain
Department of Education and Training, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Educreative, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

WITHDRAWN - Oral language difficulties in the adult prison population: Are the youth justice figures repeated?
Linda Hand, Hayden Davies, Natasha Boyack, Clare McCann
The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

M3C | Dysphagia assessment

Using Allied Health Assistants to conduct dysphagia screening in an acute hospital setting
Maria Schwarz1,2, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Petrea Cornwell4, Anne Coccetti1
1Logan Hospital, Metro South Hospital and Health Service, Logan, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Does the implementation of an e-learning package to medical and nursing staff improve adherence to dysphagia screening?
Nicole Reyes
Cabrini Health, Malvern, VIC, Australia

Implementation and evaluation of speech pathology-led referring process for videofluoroscopic swallow studies (P)
Shana Taubert1, Clare Burns1, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Lynell Bassett1, Linda Porter1, Penni Burfein1
1Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies: Which aspects should be analysed? Consensus from an international Delphi Study (P)
Katina Swan1, Reinie Cordier1, Ted Brown2, Renee Speyer3
1Curtin University, Bentley, WA, Australia. 2Monash University, Peninsula, VIC, Australia. 3University of Oslo, Blindernveien, Norway

Videofluoroscopic measures of older patients with new swallowing difficulties during unrelated hospitalisation
Marie Jardine1, Anna Miles1, Jacqui Allen1,2
1The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. 2Waitemata District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand

Impact of objective videofluoroscopic swallowing measures on analysis and clinical recommendations
Gwenda Kerrison1,2, Anna Miles1, Michael Heron1, Jacqui Allen1,3
1University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. 2Waikato District Health Board, Hamilton, Waikato, New Zealand. 3Waitemata District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand

Real-time measurement of radiation doses for speech pathologists conducting Videofluoroscopic Swallow Studies (VFSS) (P)
Kellie McCarthy
Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Expert opinions regarding the factors that influence videofluoroscopy training (P)
Ann Edwards1, Elspeth Froude2, Paul Carding1, Gabriella Sharpe3, Leigha Dark2
1Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

M3D  | Clinical education 2

Development of a community of practice for speech pathologists with an interest in clinical education (SPICE) (P)
Simone Howells1, Lucy Lyons2, Anne Hill3, Olivia Brincat1
1Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 2Mater Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Simulation research in speech pathology: Outcomes, lessons learned and translation into curricula
Anne Hill1, Elizabeth Ward1, Adriana Penman1, Emma Caird1, Danielle Aldridge1, Bronwyn Davidson2, Sally Hewat3, Joanne Walters3, Simone Howells4, Alison Purcell5, Patricia McCabe5, Rachel Davenport6, Sue McAllister5, Elizabeth Cardell4, Stacey Baldac7, Robert Heard5
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. 4Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 6La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 7Speech Pathology Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Speech pathologists’ perceptions of student impact: A qualitative study in NSW Health
Elizabeth Bourne1, Belinda Kenny1, Lindy McAllister1, Kate Short2
1The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Liverpool Health Service, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Perspectives of family-centred practice in speech pathology students and clinical educators
Trishala Thamilselvan, Maree Doble, Steven Cumming
The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia

Exploring the role of Tāngata Whaiora in the education of healthcare professionals in Aotearoa
Nadia Mantell1, Tony Spelman2, Philippa Friary1, Bianca Jackson1, Clare McCann1, Alice Darragh3
1The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. 2People With Parkinson's Inc, Auckland, New Zealand. 3Mid Central DHB, Palmerston North, New Zealand

Sharing intercultural skills and knowledge: What clinical educators learn from culturally and linguistically diverse speech pathology students during professional placements
Stacie Attrill, Chris Brebner, Christopher Lind, Amanda Wray, Karinna Hall
Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia

M3E | Disability 2

Experiences and opinions of families with a member with Down Syndrome about speech language therapy in New Zealand (P)
Ritsey Harewood, Linda Hand
The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

What interventions can we provide for autistic adults?
Jae-Hyun Kim1, Yu-Wei Chen2, Anders Nordahl-Hansen3, Ho Ching Wu2, Renee Speyer4, Reinie Cordier5
1Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3Østfold University College, Halden, Østfold, Norway. 4The University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. 5Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia

Assisting young people with communication and mealtime support needs in residential aged care to access the NDIS
Emily Burke, Natalie Berg, Michelle Bennett, Elspeth Froude
Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Drooling in children with neuro-disability: A survey of Australian speech-language pathologists’ practice
Michelle McInerney1, Dinah Reddihough2, Paul Carding1, Christine Imms1
1Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2MCRI, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

WITHDRAWN Teaching a child with ASD and language disorder to generate original fictional narratives
Kate Favot, Mark Carter, Jennifer Stephenson
Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Improving functional communication outcomes for children with cerebral palsy (P)
Johanna Korkalainen1, Patricia McCabe2, Andy Smidt2
1Cerebral Palsy Alliance, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

1800RESPECT: A virtual training model designed to engage and empower
Katie Lyon1, Hannah Taylor2, Georgia Burn1
1Scope (Australia), Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Medibank, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

M3F Assessment and treatment of children with severe speech sound disorders. Continued from M2F
Susan Rvachew
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

6.00 pm - 7.00 pm

New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association drinks

6.00 pm – 7.30 pm

Speech Pathology Australia: Annual General Meeting, Award presentations and drinks

Go to the Conference Program for Tuesday