Tuesday 4 June 2019

Overview

7.30 am 8.45 am
TB | Breakfast presentation: Early career and student breakfast meeting

9.00 am – 10.30 am
TEU | Elizabeth Usher Memorial Lecture by Professor David Copland Lost in translation? Challenges and future prospects for a neurobiological approach to aphasia rehabilitation

10.30 am – 11.00 am
Morning tea

11.00 am - 12.30 pm
T1A | The Centre for Research Excellence in aphasia recovery and rehabilitation. Centre overview, recent study results and research agenda setting (W)

T1B | Working proppa way: Engaging collaborating empowering Indigenous speech pathology (W)

T1C | Dysphagia management

T1D | Service delivery

T1E School aged - collaboration

12.30 pm – 2.00 pm
Lunch

12.45 pm – 1.45 pm
TL1 |Towards 2030: Have your say on the review of the Speech Pathology Australia Code of Ethics (W)

TL2 | Volunteering to create sustainability in Majority World countries

2.00 pm – 3.30 pm
TGG | Grace Gane Memorial Lecture by Professor Suzanne Purdy (Te Rarawa, Ngai Takoto)  Communication research in the context of the whare tapa whā health model: Neurological conditions; auditory-processing disorder; youth justice; social disadvantage

3.30 pm – 4.00 pm
Afternoon tea

4.00 pm – 5.30 pm
T2A | Enabling communication in rehabilitation

T2B | Working with Indigenous children - partnerships

T2C | Laryngology: A whole new world for speech pathologists (W)

T2D | Hearing

T2E | School aged - research

T2F | Consumer panel and discussion

5.15 pm – 6.15 pm
T3A | Development of competency standards for the future: CBOS review

6.15 pm – 7.15 pm
University Staff Reception

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7.30 am – 8.45 am

TB | Early Career and Student breakfast meeting

Welcome to this breakfast. This is the second time this event will be held at the National Conference. It is an initiative from the Early Career Reference Group and sponsored by Guild Insurance.

At the breakfast, participants will hear from:

  • Anna Pannuzzo, WorkPlacePLUS who will speak about the National Award and all matters pertaining to employment in both the private and public sectors.
  • Leigh Harper, Client Partner Manager, Guild Insurance, who will speak about professional indemnity and liability insurance.
  • Nichola Harris, Manger, Professional Practice, National office, who will speak about resources produced by Speech Pathology Australia and the Early Career Reference Group.

Participants will also have an opportunity to ask questions, network with peers and discuss issues that are relevant to this community, as well as enjoy a delicious

Attendance number: 85

9.00 am - 10.30 am

TEU | Elizabeth Usher Memorial Lecture
Lost in translation? Challenges and future prospects for a neurobiological approach to aphasia rehabilitation

Professor David Copland

10.30 am - 11.00 am

Morning tea

11.00 am - 12.30 pm

T1A | The Centre for Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation: Centre overview and recent study results (W)
Miranda Rose1,2, David Copland2,3, Leanne Togher2,4, Erin Godecke2,5, Robyn O'Halloran1,2, John Pierce1,2, Caroline Baker2,6, Maya Menahemi-Falkov1,2
1La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Centre for Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 5Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia. 6Monash Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Aphasia compromises every aspect of daily life and has a significant impact on family functioning. The impaired ability to communicate means a constant struggle to engage with existing healthcare services, and systematic exclusion from research. As an especially vulnerable population, those facing aphasia after stroke have the poorest healthcare outcomes and the highest costs in their stroke care, inadequate hospital and community rehabilitation and difficulty participating in community life. Accurate prediction of recovery from aphasia, and of response to treatment, remains elusive – creating huge economic and personal burdens. Available high-quality evidence has not been translated into accessible and sustainable models of care, and technology has not been adequately harnessed. Aphasia’s complex and varied effects demand sustained interdisciplinary research and clinical responses. Without well-coordinated rehabilitation and care, this population is at risk of social, emotional, and physical isolation, and vulnerable to costly but avoidable medical and psychosocial complications. Our newly funded multidisciplinary Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation aims to address the most pressing issues in aphasia care through four programs of research:

  • Neurobiological and psychosocial predictors of aphasia recovery
  • Enhancing treatment effectiveness across the continuum of care
  • Technology for healthcare communication and aphasia rehabilitation
  • Optimising mental health and wellbeing in aphasia

The centre’s aims and research programs will be presented, followed by 5 talks reporting latest evidence in intensity of aphasia treatment, maintenance of therapy gains, psychological wellbeing, and communicative accessible hospital environments. A 20 minute open discussion will complete the session.

Introduction/rationale: Five 12 minute talks include:

  1. A systematic review of treatment intensity in chronic aphasia 
  2. Intensity of treatment in acute and sub-acute aphasia rehabilitation: Results from the VERSE trial of early aphasia intervention 
  3. Maintenance matters- what factors are important to the long-term preservation of intensive program gains for people with chronic aphasia
  4. Stepping Up’ to deliver psychological care for people with aphasia after stroke: Solutions to the evidence-practice gap 
  5. Addressing barriers to create accessible systems

Objectives: Participants will;

  1. be updated on latest evidence concerning intensity of aphasia treatment for acute and chronic aphasia
  2. understand factors contributing to maintenance of gains from aphasia therapy
  3. consider solutions addressing the evidence-practice gap for delivering psychological care for people with aphasia
  4. consider barriers that limit the creation of accessible hospital communication systems for people with aphasia
  5. discuss implications of the presented research findings

Results or practice implications: Results encompass evidence from an Australian RCT examining acute intensive aphasia therapy compared to usual care; a systematic review of intensive treatments in chronic aphasia; a systematic review of factors that contribute to maintenance of gains following intensive aphasia therapy interventions; integrated findings from a systematic review and two qualitative studies investigating the perspectives of stroke health professionals and people with aphasia about overcoming barriers to translating stepped psychological care; and qualitative work examining accessible hospital communication environments.

Learning outcomes: Participants will:

  1. understand the latest evidence concerning intensity of aphasia treatment for acute and chronic aphasia and the factors contributing to maintenance of therapy gains 
  2. consider solutions addressing the evidence-practice gap for delivering psychological care for people with aphasia and consider to feasible implementation strategies 
  3. devise strategies to overcome the barriers that limit the creation of accessible hospital communication systems for people with aphasia

Conclusion: Aphasia is a common and highly impactful communication disability. This workshop showcases latest evidence to improve services in acute, subacute and community settings and invites participants to engage with newly funded Centre for Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation.

Disclosure (financial and non-financial): Miranda Rose, Leanne Togher and David Copland receive financial support from the National Health Medical Research Council.

Attendance number: 80

T1B | Working Proppa Way: Engaging, Collaborating and Empowering (W)
Tara Lewis1,2, Cori Williams3
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Speech Pathology Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

This workshop focuses on culturally sensitive approaches to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It has been developed by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee and aims to engage both researchers and clinicians. It will include a 30 minute presentation on the theoretical underpinnings of Indigenous Research Methodologies, two 20 minute presentations highlighting research or clinical projects which provide models of good practice in the area, and a panel discussion and open comment session Where to for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island research and practice in speech pathology? This is an important session for the Association as it moves to focus on increasing cultural awareness in the membership, and in ensuring culturally appropriate services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Specifically, it will address initiatives under the aspiration Clients and Communities Driving Services.

Introduction/rationale: Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and communities requires an understanding of culture, language and history, including the impacts of colonisation, language loss, white privilege and racism, both individual and institutional. Whether research or clinical practice is under consideration, there is a need to adopt culturally responsive practices to ensure outcomes that are engaging, empowering and collaborative. 

Objectives:

  • To develop understanding of Indigenous Research Methodologies
  • To adapt the principles of Indigenous Research Methodologies to clinical practice settings
  • To provide models of good practice in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Results or practice implications: Researchers and clinicians will be empowered to work in culturally responsive ways to address speech, language, communication and swallowing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Learning outcomes: After completing this workshop, participants will;

  • Be challenged to work responsively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Understand Indigenous Research Methodologies
  • Adapt the principles of Indigenous Research Methodologies to clinical practice settings
  • Recognise and value models of good practice in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Conclusion: This workshop directly addresses aspirations of the SPA Strategic Plan 2017 – 2019. It will challenge participants to acknowledge white privilege and to examine their current practice in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Discussion of the way forward will inform future research and practice. 

Attendance number: 80

T1C | Dysphagia management

Australian speech pathologists’ approaches to complex feeding decisions in dysphagia management
Maria Schwarz1,2, Anne Coccetti1, Elizabeth Cardell3, Lucy Lyons4, Tanya Hurst4
1Logan Hospital, Metro South Hospital and Health Service, Logan, QLD, Australia. 2University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Griffith University, Menzies Health Institute, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 4Mater Health Service, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Carbonated fluids: Could preparation and other sensory impacts influence patient performance?
Leisa Turkington1,2, Elizabeth Ward2, Anna Farrell1
1Royal Brisbane and Women's hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

‘It’s not just what’s on the plate’: Allied health professionals' roles in the mealtimes of people with dementia
Aisling Egan, Anja Lowit, Carolyn Andrews
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom

Measuring nursing satisfaction and efficiency with use of an instant liquid thickener: A trial of thickening liquid medications and supplements (P)
Jodie Connolly1, Emma Finch1,2,3
1Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Dysphagia care in the community: Exploring speech-language pathologist perceptions and practices (P)
Simone Howells1, Petrea Cornwell2, Elizabeth Ward3,4, Pim Kuipers1,4
1Griffith University, Southport, QLD, Australia. 2Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 4Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Buranda, QLD, Australia

A multimodal rehabilitation therapy protocol for pre-swallow aspiration in dysphagia: The Progressive Bolus Hold (P)
Inger Kwiecien1, Blaise Hamlet1, Maria Schwarz1,2, Elizabeth Cardell3
1Logan Hospital, Meadowbrook, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 3Griffith University, Southport, QLD, Australia

Normative data on swallowing in healthy Australians (P)
Megan Keage1,2, Sandra Rojas1,2, Adriana Psaltis1,2, Wen Xin Carolyn Goh1,2, Georgia Campbell1,2, Michael Prewer1,2, Adam Vogel1,2
1Centre for Neuroscience of Speech, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Clinical progression and outcome of swallowing impairment following non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage: A retrospective cohort study
Katrina Dunn1,2,3, Anna Rumbach2
1West Moreton Health, Ipswich, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

T1D | Service delivery

Our relationships with clients and their families: How family-centred are paediatric and adult speech pathology services?
Nerina Scarinci, Tanya Rose, Carly Meyer
The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia

A professional development course for speech-language therapists working with Māori adults with acquired communication disorders
Karen Brewer, Clare McCann
The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Taranaki Talking 'Yeah, Nah…What?' A multi-agency initiative
Fiona Fox1, Mary-Elizabeth Hagenson1, Jeanette Brown1, Shane Gowler2
1Ministry of Education, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand. 2Oranga Tamariki, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand

“Struggling and needing help”: Experiences of waiting for speech pathology services in Australia
Nicole McGill1, Kathryn Crowe1,2, Sharynne McLeod1
1Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia. 2University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark

Waiting lists and prioritisation for paediatric speech pathology services: Speech pathologists’ perspectives
Nicole McGill1, Sharynne McLeod1, Kathryn Crowe1,2, Suzanne Hopf3
1Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia. 2University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark. 3Charles Sturt University, Albury, NSW, Australia

When children die: Speech pathology and allied health services for paediatric palliative care in a regional setting
Kelly Weir1,2, Kylie Gill2, Angela Delaney3, Susan Moloney2, Anthony Herbert3, Sharon MIckan1,2, Michelle Noyes2, Timothy Hong2, Andrew Broadbent2
1Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 2Gold Coast health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 3Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

T1E | School aged - collaboration

Collaborating to support children’s early literacy success
Gail Gillon1,2, Brigid McNeill2, Amy Scott2, Leanne Wilson2, Karyn Carson1,3, Amanda Denston2, Angus Macfarlane1,2
1UC Child Well-Being Research Institute, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand. 2University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand. 3Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Oral language and emergent literacy screening tool at school entry: A collaboration with teachers and researchers (P)
Jane Carroll1, Elizabeth Schaughency1, Annie McCambridge2
1University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. 2Wanaka Primary School, Wanaka, Central Otago, New Zealand

Engaging the research evidence to effect change in class literacy instruction
Amy Scott, Gail Gillon, Brigid McNeill
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Language, classroom performance, and quality of life outcomes for children with atresia (P)
Anna Hyland1, Wendy Arnott1,2, Emma Rushbrooke1, Simone Cheadle1
1Hear and Say, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

“Definitely room for improvement!” Teachers’ perceptions of collaborative practices with speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in schools
Kelsey Brady, Jae-Hyun Kim
Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

If we want to collaborate more effectively we need to develop new frameworks (P)
Kendra Bell-Hayes
Next Challenge, Perth, WA, Australia

‘A policeman, speech pathologist and teacher walk into a school….’ Working together to improve the learning for trauma affected students
Karen James
James Meehan Secondary School, Sydney, NSW, Australia

12.30 pm – 2.00 pm

Lunch

12.45 pm – 1.45 pm

TL1 | Towards 2030: Have your say on the review of the Speech Pathology Australia Code of Ethics
Trish Johnson1, Suze Leitao2, Patricia Bradd3, Susan Block4, Helen Smith5, Nerina Scarinci6, Alison Holm7, David Kinnane8, Tristan Nickless9, Tanya Serry4, Suzanne Burow10, Donna Dancer10, Cezanne Green11, Richard Saker12
1Speech Pathology Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia. 3South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 5Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, SA, Australia. 6The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 7Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 8Banter Speech & Language, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 9Word by Mouth Pty Ltd, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 10Community Representative, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 11Community Representative, Adelaide, SA, Australia. 12Community Representative, Perth, WA, Australia

Speech Pathology Australia initially developed a Code of Ethics (the Code) for members back in 1976 and have performed reviews and revisions of the Code in 1987, 2000 and 2010. The 2000 revision resulted in a marked departure from the previous Code, taking a plain English, aspirational approach rather than that of prescription to the membership. In order to ensure the Code continues to align with contemporary issues within the profession and broader community, another major review will commence in 2019 for publication in 2020. The revised Code will reflect the evolving environments of speech pathology practice and the needs of the profession and will be achieved through an ongoing collaboration between the members of the Ethics Board, the Board of Directors, members of the association, and targeted profession and consumer consultation.

The 2019 Ethics workshop will provide an opportunity for you as members to contribute to the review, so join us to have your say. Contemporary ethical issues being addressed by the Ethics Board will be discussed, alongside an opportunity for members to reflect on current and future directions for the Code.

Introduction/rationale: A major review of the Code of Ethics will be achieved through collaboration between key stakeholders, including the Association's Ethics Board, the Board of Directors, as well as targeted consultation with members and consumers. This workshop will provide members with an opportunity to participate in the review, to develop a Code of Ethics that will guide and support proactive ethical and professional practice into the future.

Objectives:

  • To provide an opportunity for members to participate in the review of the Code of Ethics
  • To explore current and future environments of speech pathology practice and consider how a Code of Ethics supports proactive ethical and professional practice in a broad range of contexts
  • To identify and consider aspirational ethical standards for contemporary speech pathology practice
  • To consider current and future community expectations of ethical professional practice

Results or practice implications: Ethical issues in contemporary and future speech pathology practice will be presented and discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their professional experience, to identify and align standards for ethical professional practice. 

Participant contributions will build an understanding of current and future speech pathology practice to inform the review of the Code of Ethics.

Learning outcomes:

  • Identification of ethical issues inherent in contemporary and future speech pathology practice
  • Consideration of appropriate ethical values, principles and standards that support ethical speech pathology practice
  • Contribution to the development of a revised Code of Ethics that reflects the evolving environments of speech pathology practice, the needs of the profession and the community

Conclusion: The workshop will provide an opportunity for members to explore current and future standards of ethical and professional speech pathology practice and to contribute to the development of a revised version of the Code of Ethics.

Attendance number: Unlimited

TL2 |Volunteering to create sustainability in Majority World countries
In many Majority-world (developing) countries, the profession of speech therapy is in its infancy. Whilst volunteering, Australian Government placement programs and student mobility programs are on the rise, barriers and facilitators of these services especially in regards to sustainability exist.

There are many considerations in the provision of services in Majority-world countries with respect to the community receiving the service (such as sustainability of the service, gain and impact on the community) and the individual participating in the activity (such as motivation to participate, cultural preparedness, and short and long term life-changing effects).

The aim of this presentation is to present the experiences and models of capacity building speech therapy services implemented by Australian Speech Pathologists in some Majority world countries and highlight the ways they have ensured sustainability. The gains of volunteering and working in a global context and the barriers and facilitators to service delivery will be highlighted.

2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

TGG | Grace Gane Memorial Lecture

Communication research in the context of the whare tapa whã health model: Neurological conditions; auditory-processing disorder; youth justice; social disadvantage

Professor Suzanne Purdy (Te Rarawa, Ngai Takoto)

3.00 pm – 3.30 pm

Afternoon tea

3.30 pm – 5.00 pm

T2A | Enabling communication in rehabilitation

How do speech pathologists communicate prognosis to people with aphasia after stroke? Results from an Australian online survey
Bonnie Cheng, Sarah Wallace, Linda Worrall, David Copland
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Empowering stroke survivors with communication impairments to set person centered goals
Amanda Elston1,2, Rebecca Barnden1,2, Deborah Hersh3, Erin Godecke3, Dominique Cadilhac4, Nadine Andrew2
1Peninsula Health, Frankston, VIC, Australia. 2Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia. 3Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. 4Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia

Exploring the communication experiences of stroke nurses and patients with acquired stroke-related communication disorders on an acute stroke unit
Renee Heard, Chloe Horsted
Barwon Health, Geelong, VIC, Australia

Relational communication: A critical factor in developing therapeutic relationships with people experiencing communication disability
Felicity Bright
Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand

WITHDRAWN: Patients as teachers: Communication skills training for health professionals (P)
Ruth Townsend1, Kathryn McKinley2, Joanne Sweeney1
1Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2St. Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Therapeutic relationships in aphasia therapy: Why do we work as we do?
Felicity Bright1, Stacie Attrill2, Deborah Hersh3
1Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. 2Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia. 3Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia

T2B | Working with Indigenous children – partnerships

“Ko te reo te mauri o te mana Māori” “Language is the essence of power itself”
Roimata Manaia Haynes1,2, Machelle Dick3, Elaine Ballard1
1The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. 2Ohomairangi Trust, Auckland, New Zealand. 3Rūmaki reo Māori, Auckland, New Zealand

Empowering early years educators to improve communication outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with conductive hearing loss (P)
Megan Tibbits, Bonny Marsh
Deadly Ears Program, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Speech pathologists' preparedness and experiences when working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families (P)
Sally Zingelman1, Wendy Pearce2
1Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Creating effective partnerships: The development of speech pathology services within an Aboriginal preschool in Lismore
Lex Hall1, Maurita Cavanough 2, Jodie Huggins2
1Private Practice, Alstonville, NSW, Australia. 2The Jarjum Centre, Lismore, NSW, Australia

Engaging in research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: The back story (P)
Gwendalyn Webb1, Emma Beckett2, Cori Williams3
1The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. 2Muloobinba Aboriginal Corporation, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. 3Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia

Collaborating to enhance listening environments in remote early childhood settings (P)
Kate Deveson, Frances Bugden
Deadly Ears Program, Children's Health Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Maximising service accessibility for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children: Experiences and perceptions of a family centered consultation model
Helen Sargison1, Bonny Marsh1, Yolanda Fernandez1, Josephine Ferguson1, Deborah Askew2, Claudette Tyson2, Wendy Foley2, Tanya Rose3, Nerina Scarinci3, Jodie Copley3
1Childrens Health QLD, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Southern QLD Centre of Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

T2C | Laryngology: A whole new world for speech pathologists? (W)
Debbie Phyland1,2, Anna Miles3
1Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Monash Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

The field of laryngology within Australia and New Zealand has evolved greatly over the past decade and, along with our laryngologist colleagues, speech pathologists are an integral part of this progression and collaboration. As a result, the role of the speech pathologist in the clinical assessment and management of laryngeal conditions causing dysphonia, dysphagia, cough and vocal cord dysfunction has developed and altered in terms of the clinical standards of care and scope of practice. This provides abundant and varied research and clinical opportunities for speech pathologists to foray further into the worlds of basic science, sports science, motor learning, vocology, acoustics, physiology, pharmacology and respiratory medicine, to name a few.

This forum aims to explore practical and conceptual information related to the role and practice of speech pathologists working in laryngology (particularly in voice, cough, vocal cord dysfunction and related areas). The presenters will present and engage in discussion on current standards of care and clinical guidelines in voice disorders and other laryngeal-related interventions. There will also be opportunity for audience polling so as to optimise interaction and glean both Australian and New Zealand perspectives on perceived levels of confidence and competence in this clinical area. In particular, we will be seeking to ascertain opinion as to what competencies are considered core versus advanced and what are considered minimum standards of care. We hope this seminar will empower speech pathologists to jump on board and embrace the dynamic area of laryngology as a natural fit with our skillset.

Introduction/rationale: Advancements in the laryngology field over the past decade or so have been exciting and tremendous and there is an obvious opportunity to increase awareness of these across the speech pathology profession. As an integral part of the laryngology team, we have much to contribute. We propose however that there is an urgent need herein to build confidence in our clinical skillset and knowledge-base and to identify core competencies to ensure we are optimising our role as speech pathologists.

Objectives:

  1. provide an overview of the current state of laryngology
  2. present practical clinical information and resources
  3. canvass opinion on and discuss minimum standards and clinical guidelines for speech pathologists working in the laryngology field
  4. identify areas of future growth and opportunity for speech pathology

Results or practice implications: This seminar should have clinical practice implications for speech pathologists working in any clinical context but will be most useful for those working in medical, community or private practice contexts.

Learning outcomes:

  1. to identify areas of recent change in speech practice
  2. to critically appraise the current standards of care in the participant's own context
  3. to understand own learning needs in order to provide the current best practice in this field

Conclusion: It is hoped the seminar will incite and empower speech pathologists to embrace this field of speech pathology endeavour and to pursue excellence in clinical laryngology.

Attendance number: Unlimited

T2D | Hearing
Factors influencing caregivers to change the communication method of their child with hearing loss: The parent experience
Nerina Scarinci1,2, Monica Gehrke1, Teresa Ching2,3, Vivienne Marnane3, Laura Button3
1The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 2HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Speech, sign, or both? A qualitative analysis of the factors influencing parents' decision-making for their child with hearing loss
Michelle Saetre-Turner1,2, Teresa Ching1,2, Nerina Scarinci2,3, Vivienne Marnane1,2, Jessica Sjahalam-King1,2, Laura Button1,2, Jessica Whitfield1,2
1National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

A decision aid to assist families of children with hearing loss choose telepractice or in-person services
Monique Waite1,2, Jenny Atkins1,2, Carly Meyer1,2, Nerina Scarinci1,2, Emma Rushbrooke1,3, Katie Ekberg2, Caitlin Barr1,4, Robert Cowan1,4, Louise Hickson1,2
1The HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Hear and Say, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Predicting the acquisition of typical language skills in young children with hearing loss (P)
Man Fai Sio1, Wendy Arnott1,2, Emma Rushbrooke2, Jessica Balfour-Ogilvy2
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Hear and Say, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Does phoneme awareness therapy improve hearing in school aged children with auditory processing disorder? (P)
Lucy Sparshott, Bill Keith, Suzanne Purdy, Melissa Baily
University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Talk Town: A digital game to support pragmatic and self-advocacy skills in deaf and hard of hearing learners (P)
Rosie Lamb, Zoe Hector
Talk Town Ltd, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a health concern: Can Queensland detect and treat CMV in babies with hearing loss?
Lauren McHugh
Children’s Health Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

T2E | School aged - research

Do they really catch up? Examining the narrative and emergent literacy skills of pre-schoolers with a history of late talking
Rosemary Hodges, Elise Baker, Natalie Munro, Sarah Masso
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

The Information Score as a Measure of Oral Discourse Comprehension in the Early School Years
Meagan Tucker, Suze Leitao, Emily Dawes, Mary Claessen
Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia

Examining the effectiveness of an intensive six-week school-based phonological and orthographic processing intervention for Year 5 students with dyslexia
Marleen Westerveld1, Rebecca Armstrong2,3, Jennifer Peach2
1Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 2Department of Education, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Using Reading Doctor to accelerate class-level reading development for children with and without low language ability
Tiffany Winn, Karyn Carson, Greg Collings, Willem Van Steenbrugge
Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia

A classroom acoustics guide for speech pathologists 101
Rebecca Armstrong1,2, Cerys Downing1,2, Keely Harper-Hill2,3, Kelsey Palghat1,2, Jill Ashburner2,4, Wayne Wilson1,2
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3School of Cultural and Professional Learning, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Autism Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

T2F | Consumer Panel
Geneva Hakaraia-Tino, NZSTA’s Giving Voice ambassador and an AAC user will facilitate a consumer panel which will challenge us to reflect on how well we are really doing at engaging, connecting with, and empowering our clients and their family/whānau.

5.15 pm – 6.15 pm

T3A | Development of competency standards for the future
Stacey Baldac1, Simone Arnott1, Gretchen Young2, Angela Murray3, Katy O'Callaghan4
1Speech Pathology Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Young Futures, Kenmore, QLD, Australia. 3Bunyip and Associates Pty Ltd, Vale Park, SA, Australia. 4Outpost Consulting, Mt Nebo, QLD, Australia

The review of the Competency Based Occupational Standards for Speech Pathologists (CBOS 2011, revised 2017) commenced in 2018, with an expected completion of December 2019. CBOS details the minimum standards for the profession of speech pathology, as well as defining the profession's range of practice and expectations about competency. CBOS outlines the standards required for university accreditation, re-entry to the profession, assessment of overseas trained speech pathologists and the level of competence employers and the public can expect from early career speech pathologists. 

The CBOS review is an important initiative of Speech Pathology Australia. It will support the development of a future ready workforce capable of delivering best practice and fulfilling the vision and aspirations articulated in the Speech Pathology 2030: making futures happen project. 

The CBOS review is providing the opportunity for all Australian speech pathologists and a range of stakeholders to contribute. This session provides another opportunity to engage with the review. Participants will hear about, discuss and provide feedback on the review progress to date. Discussion will focus on the recommended framework, nomenclature and possible standards. Participants will also be provided with information about the CBOS review process, literature review and member and stakeholder consultations.

This session is suitable for individuals with an interest in re-shaping the competency standards of the profession for the future. 

6.15 pm – 7.15 pm

University Staff Reception

Go to the Conference Program for Wednesday