Wednesday 5 June 2019

Overview

9.00 am - 10.30 am
WKP
| Keynote Address by Professor Marian Brady Communicating as simply as possible - but not too simply

10.30 am – 11.00 am
Morning tea

11.00 am – 12.30 pm
W1A
 | Keynote Seminar Presentation by Professor Marian Brady Oral healthcare after stroke (S) Continues W2A

W1B | AAC/CCN

W1C | Paediatric feeding

W1D | Early intervention 1

W1E | Speech - research

12.30 pm – 2.00 pm
Lunch (including Poster session)

2.00 pm – 3.30 pm
W2A
 | Keynote Seminar Presentation by Professor Marian Brady Oral healthcare after stroke (S) Continued from W1A

W2B | Collaborating and engaging in augmentative and alternative communication assessment (W)

W2C | Cancer care

W2D | Early intervention 2

W2E | Speech - intervention

3.30 pm – 4.00 pm
Afternoon tea 

4.00 pm – 5.00 pm
W3A 
Global issues

W3B | Working with Indigenous children - language

W3C | Collaboration

W3D | Developing a prioritised agenda to drive speech-language pathology research within health: A panel discussion (N)

W3E | Speech - specialised

5.00 pm – 5.30 pm
Close of Engaging Collaborating Empowering and launch of 2020 National Conference Darwin

7.00 pm – 12.00 am
Pre Dinner Drinks and Guild Insurance Conference Dinner

+++++

9.00 am - 10.30 am

WKP |Keynote Presentation: Communicating as simply as possible – but not too simply

Professor Marian Brady

10.30 am - 11.00 am

Morning tea

11.00 am - 12.30 pm

W1A |Keynote Seminar: Oral healthcare after stroke (S) Continues W2A

Professor Marian Brady

W1B | AAC/CCN

Australian and New Zealand speech pathologists’ perceptions of their training and experience in using alternative and augmentative communication
Aylin Huzmeli 1, Dean Sutherland 2, Andy Smidt1, Roger Stancliffe1, Leanne Togher 1, Natalie Munro 1
1The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Instructional strategies used to teach Key Word Sign: Engaging with Australian speech pathologists about their decision-making processes and practices
Leigha Dark, Rachel Maiden, Nisrine El Choueifati
Australian Catholic University, North Sydney, NSW, Australia

“It was smoke bombed by everyone”: How SLPs have contributed to the rejection and abandonment of AAC systems
Alison Moorcroft1,2, Nerina Scarinci1,2, Carly Meyer1,2
1The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 2Communication Disability Centre, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia

“I've had a love-hate, I mean mostly hate relationship with these PODD books”: Family contributions to AAC rejection and abandonment
Alison Moorcroft1,2, Nerina Scarinci1,2, Carly Meyer1,2
1The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 2Communication Disability Centre, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia

Collaborating and engaging in augmentative and alternative communication assessment
Amy Litton1, Charlene Cullen2
1Link Assistive, Perth, WA, Australia. 2Link Assistive, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Outcomes of a state-wide communication aid service for children and families
Hilary Johnson1,2, Naomi Rezzani2, Marion Van Nierop2, Alison Heppell2
1La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Scope, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

W1C |Paediatric feeding

Outcomes for children born <30 weeks: Behavioural feeding in children born very preterm
Katherine Sanchez1,2, Jessica Boyce1,2, Angela Morgan1,2,3, Alicia Spittle1,2,4
1Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia. 2The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. 3The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia. 4The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia

Factors contributing to paediatric tube feeding dependence: The speech-language therapy perspective
Emily Jones1, Helen Southwood2,1, Catherine Cook1, Tom Nicholson1
1Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand. 2The University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia

Stories of mealtimes with a child who is tube-fed: An analysis of parent blog entries (P)
Bianca Jackson1, Emma Smith2
1University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. 2Ministry of Education, Auckland, New Zealand

Correlation between the Eating and Drinking Classification System and standardised assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy
Kelly Weir1,2, Katherine Benfer3, Robert Ware1, Josephine Garvey4, Roslyn Boyd3, Joan Arvedson5, Peter Davies3, Kristie Bell3
1Menzies Health Institute Queensland (Griffith University), Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 2Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. 3The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Jo Garvey Consulting, Amsterdam, Netherlands. 5Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA

Comparison of teats to support successful oral feeding in preterm infants: A randomised cross over trial (SOFTT)
Rachael Fairhurst1, Angie Canning1, Timothy Hong1, Liz Chappell1, Robert Ware2, Kelly Weir1,2
1Gold Coast Health, Southport, QLD, Australia. 2Menzies Health Institute Queensland (Griffith University), Gold Coast, QLD, Australia

Telesupervision for speech pathologists upskilling in paediatric dysphagia
Jeanne Marshall1,2, Nicky Graham1
1Children's Health Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

W1D|Early intervention 1

WITHDRAWN The impact of social disadvantage and linguistic diversity on the language skills of children starting school
Moira Nelson1, Alison Leversha2, Suzanne Purdy1
1Auckland University, Auckland, New Zealand. 2Starship Hospital, ADHB, Auckland, New Zealand

Paths to good and low language: Children experiencing adversity who received a home visiting intervention (P)
Kate Short1,2,3, Patricia Eadie4, Lynn Kemp5,3
1Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW, Australia. 2The University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia. 3Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW, Australia. 4The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 5Western Sydney University, Liverpool, NSW, Australia

Outcomes for children born <30 weeks: The impact of very preterm birth on expressive morphosyntax at three years of age
Katherine Sanchez1,2,3, Linda Leembruggen3, Stephanie Mills3, Alicia Spittle1,4,5, Angela Morgan2,3,6
1Victorian Infant Brain Studies Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Group, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Speech and Language Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Group, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 4Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 5Newborn Research, the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 6Department of Speech Pathology, the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

The It Takes Two to Talk® - The Hanen Program® for parents: Looking beyond child language outcomes
Tanya Rose1, Nerina Scarinci1, Carly Meyer1, Shareen Forsingdal2, Narelle Anger2, Kylie Webb2
1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Understanding mothers’ perspectives and experiences of early communication development and its facilitation (P)
Sophie Slavin, Deb James, Michelle Donelly
Southern Cross University, Coolangatta, QLD, Australia

Outcomes for children born <30 weeks: Lexical diversity in connected speech at three years of age
Katherine Sanchez1,2,3, Naomi Mitchell3, Jasmin Treloar3, Alicia Spittle2,4,5, Angela Morgan1,3,6
1Speech and Language Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Victorian Infant Brain Studies Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 3Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 4Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 5Newborn Research, the Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 6Department of Speech Pathology, the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Pragmatic aspects of language in bilingual Arabic-English speaking children (P)
Zainab Aldawood, Linda Hand, Elaine Ballard
The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

What do families think about becoming engaged in early intervention? Using video-reflexive ethnography to explore the complexity of clinical interactions
Katelyn Melvin, Carly Meyer, Nerina Scarinci
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

W1E Speech – research

Connected speech in children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Catherine Barrett1, Patricia McCabe1, Sarah Masso1, Jonathan Preston2
1The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia. 2Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA

How do we diagnose childhood apraxia of speech versus other speech sound disorders? Answers from a systematic review (P)
Elizabeth Murray1, Jenya Iuzzini-Seigel2, Edwin Maas3, Hayo Terband4, Kirrie Ballard1
1The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia. 2Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. 4Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

Diagnostic reliability for childhood apraxia of speech: How good is the gold standard?
Elizabeth Murray1, Shelley Velleman2, Jonathan Preston3, Patricia McCabe1, Robert Heard1
1The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia. 2University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA. 3Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, USA

Reliability of novice clinicians’ scoring of children’s performance on the “SAFE for Speech” screener
Priya Nair, Elizabeth Murray, Elise Baker
The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia

Comparing children’s and parents’ perspectives about speech in the Sound Start Study
Jane McCormack1, Sharynne McLeod2, Kathryn Crowe2,3
1Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia. 3University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Responsiveness and speech accuracy in real and novel word naming tasks in toddlers (P)
Jillian Calizar, Elise Baker, Natalie Munro, Rosemary Hodges
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

12.30 pm - 2.00 pm

Lunch
(including Poster session: 12.45 pm – 1.45 pm)

2.00 pm – 3.30 pm

W2A |Keynote Seminar: Oral healthcare after stroke (S) Continued from W1A

Professor Marian Brady

W2BCollaborating and engaging in augmentative and alternative communication assessment (W)
Amy Litton1, Charlene Cullen2
1Link Assistive, Perth, WA, Australia. 2Link Assistive, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

This workshop will give participants opportunity to discuss the assessment and feature matching process in the prescription of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems across the lifespan for people with complex communication needs. Participants will work through the process of assessment through a series of case studies relevant to their field of clinical practice.

The Matching Persons with AAC Technology Model (Hill, 2010) will be discussed as a framework for supporting the AAC system feature matching process with opportunity for participants to then apply this framework to relevant case studies. Participants will then work to identify the key features required by clients within the case study and provide rationale as to why these features are required. The comparison process of AAC systems on the market will then be discussed considering the features required by the individual.

This workshop will highlight the collaboration required between key stakeholders including the speech pathologist, client, carers, assistive technology suppliers, educators and other health professionals. Resources and tools for supporting the AAC assessment and prescription process will be shared including discussion of the Speech Pathology Australia Augmentative and Alternative Communication Clinical Guidelines. 

This workshop aims to empower participants with the skills, knowledge and resources to work through the AAC feature matching process in light of the new NDIS funding context.

Introduction/rationale: Given the changes in funding context within Australia with the introduction of the NDIS this paper seeks to empower speech pathologists with the latest frameworks and research regarding AAC assessment highlighting the importance of collaboration in the prescription process. Many speech pathologists are now working with clients with complex communication needs whom previously would have accessed government disability services.

Objectives:

  1. To provide participants with the latest research and theoretical frameworks regarding the AAC assessment process
  2. To provide participants with the opportunity to work through the AAC system feature matching process given a case study relevant to their area of practice
  3. To increase participant’s awareness of the resources available to them in the AAC prescription process including research, suppliers and databases
  4. To highlight the collaborative nature of the AAC prescription process by identifying key stakeholders within case studies

Results or practice implications: This workshop will support clinical practice by providing frameworks for assessment and feature matching to help inform AAC system prescription. Resources and tools shared will support speech pathologists in providing rationale for funding for their clients.

Learning outcomes:

  1. Identify theoretical models and frameworks that support the AAC assessment process
  2. Identify key stakeholders in the assessment process
  3. Demonstrate the ability to identify required AAC system features for an individual client
  4. Provide rationale as to why specific features are required
  5. Compare and contrast available AAC systems according to features identified
  6. Identify the range of tools and resources available to support the AAC assessment process

Conclusion: This workshop seeks to empower speech pathologists with the knowledge and skills required to identify suitable communication systems for their clients with complex communication needs.

Attendance number: 80

W2C |Cancer care

How do speech pathologist develop and maintain confidence working in the area of surgical voice restoration following laryngectomy?
Kelli Hancock1,2, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Anne Hill2
1Speech Pathology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research (CFAHR), Metro South Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Impact of hyposalivation and xerostomia on oral intake post head and neck cancer care
Barbara Messing1, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Cathy Lazarus2, Carol Thompson4, Keri Ryniak1, Elizabeth Rehman1
1GBMC, The Milton J. Dance, Jr. Head and Neck Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. 2University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health, CFAHR, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Outcomes of a new speech pathology service for "low risk" patients receiving radiation for HNC: Is it safe and efficient?
Laura Moroney1,2, Jennifer Helios1, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Jane Crombie1, Clare Burns1, Claire Blake1, Anita Pelecanos4, Tracy Comans2, Lizbeth Kenny1, Benjamin Chua1, Brett Hughes1
1Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Exploring clinical practices and inter-professional relationships of speech pathologists and radiation therapists working in head and neck cancer care
Alana Hutchison1,2, Bena Cartmill1, Laurelie Wall1, Elizabeth Ward1,2, Cathy Hargrave1, Elizabeth Brown1
1Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Patients’ perspectives on what makes a better care experience whilst undergoing treatment for oropharyngeal dysphagia secondary to head and neck cancer (P)
Kate Lethbridge
Epworth Rehabilitation, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Do cancer clinicians identify the health service needs of patients and their families?
Bena Cartmill1,2,3, Laurelie Wall1,3, Elizabeth Ward1,3, Adele Coleman1, Emily Packer1
1Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Hospital and Health Service, Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Speech Pathology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Measuring the impact of dysphagia on family members
Rebecca Nund1,2, Bena Cartmill1,3, Joanne Patterson4, Nerina Scarinci2, Elizabeth Ward1,2, Sandro Porceddu2,3
1Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Queensland Health, Buranda, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia. 3Princess Alexandra Hospital, Wooloongabba, QLD, Australia. 4Newcastle University, Newcastle, upon Tyne, United Kingdom

W2D |Early intervention 2

Early childhood educators’ perspectives on what helps children’s communication development
Suanna Smith, Elizabeth Doell, Tara McLaughlin
Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

Identifying language difficulties in young children: The early childhood educator perspective
Belinda Fisher, Tanya Rose, Nerina Scarinci
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Mana tātoru, mahi tahi: Te collaboration of three. New Zealand's hikoi to a national Oral Language and Literacy Initiative - OLLi
Claire Winward
Ministry of Education, Wellington, New Zealand

Which assessment context provides more information about toddlers’ speech and language abilities: Structured or unstructured play?
Justina Sun, Elise Baker, Natalie Munro, Rosemary Hodges
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Capturing Australian children’s early vocabulary: The development of a short-form OZI (P)
Kate Jones1,2, Kate Short1,3, Chantelle Khamchuang4, Christa Lam-Cassettari5, Caroline Jones4, Cathy Kaplun6, Anne Dwyer7, Caroline Hendy7,8, Lynn Kemp2, Jane Anderson6, Natasha Bucknall6, Catherine Best4, Marina Kalashnikova4
1Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 5Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 6Translational Research and Social Innovation (TReSI) Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 7MARCS Institute of speech and language research, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 8Australian National University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

A critical realistic analysis of long-term outcomes of preschool stuttering treatment (P)
Michelle Swift1,2, Jane Taylor Matison1, Julia McCulloch1,3, Megan Hutchins4, Bianca Wagnitz1
1Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia. 2Swift Speech and Stuttering, Adelaide, SA, Australia. 3Julia McCulloch Speech Pathology, Adelaide, SA, Australia. 4SA Health - SALHN, Adelaide, SA, Australia

W2E |Speech - intervention

Severe Speech Sound Disorders Clinic: A partnership approach
Samantha Malfitano1, Jennie Cusiter1, Patricia McCabe1,2
1Liverpool Hospital, South West Sydney Local Health District, Liverpool, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia

The LISP study: A randomised control trial comparing two forms of articulation intervention
Marcia Leong1, Brooke Butt1, Jennie Cusiter2,1, Samantha Malfitano1, Jessica Anton1, Patricia McCabe1,2
1Liverpool Hospital, South West Sydney Local Health District, Liverpool, NSW, Australia. 2The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia

International comparisons of childhood apraxia of speech clinical management
Maryane Gomez, Patricia McCabe, Alison Purcell
The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia

Treating more children with childhood apraxia of speech more often
Natalie Meehan, Patricia McCabe, Cate Madill
The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Sound Start Study: Using psycholinguistic profiling to examine responsiveness to intervention
Jane McCormack1, Yvonne Wren2,3
1Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom. 3University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom

Intervention for children with speech disorders in Arabic: application of phonological contrast therapy
Manal Alsaad1,2, Patricia McCabe2, Alison Purcell2
1Kuwait University, Kuwait, Kuwait. 2The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

3.30 pm - 4.00 pm

Afternoon tea

4.00 pm – 5.00 pm

W3A | Global issues

Lessons from Ghana and Uganda
Karen Wylie1, Julie Marshall2, Jane Stokes3, Josephine Ohenewa Bampoe1, David Rochus4, Mary Wickenden5
1University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana. 2Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom. 3BriGhT Partnership, London, United Kingdom. 4Yellow House Children's Services, Kisumu, Kenya. 5Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, United Kingdom

Speech language pathology and ethical practice: Minority world clinicians in majority world countries
Bea Staley1, David Rochus2
1Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia. 2Yellow House Health and Outreach Services, Kisumu, Western, Kenya

Sexual and gender based violence prevention and sexual and reproductive health education services, for refugees with communication disabilities, in Rwanda
Julie Marshall1,2, Helen Barrett3, Sidra Anwar4
1Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom. 2University KwaZulu Natal, Durban, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. 3Communicability Global, Kigali, Rwanda. 4UNHCR, Kigali, Rwanda

Making an impact through community-based rehabilitation in Western Uganda
Charles Remo Joseph, Fiona Beckerlegge, Gamukama Murungi
Kyaninga Child Development Centre, Fort Portal, Uganda

W3B | Working with Indigenous children - language

Narrative comprehension skills of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian children in their first year of school
Sarah Shoebridge1, Wendy Pearce2, Kieran Flanagan1
1Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Developing ERLI: The Early Remote Language Inventory
Caroline Jones, Eugenie Collyer, Jaidine Fejo, Chantelle Khamchuang, Caroline Hendy, Cathy Kaplun, Natasha West-Bucknall
Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

The receptive vocabulary of four year old urban Aboriginal children: Associations to childcare attendance and reading in early childhood (P)
Natalie Cavagnino1, Kate Short2,3, Natalie Munro1, Lynn Kemp3,4
1The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 2Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3Ingham Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 4Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Koorlungkas Yarning: Children talking, a video ethnographic project
Rosemary Walley1,2, Jane Ogilvie3, Victoria Stroud1
1Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, WA, Australia. 2Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia. 3Deptartment of Communities, Perth, WA, Australia

W3C | Collaboration

Speech pathology professional identity: Themes identified by allied health assistants to support health service collaboration and delivery (P)
Madonna Mullins, Elizabeth Spencer, Rachael O'Brien
The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia

Perceptions of allied health assistants towards working with speech-language pathologists (P)
Georgia Stuart, Rachael O'Brien, Elizabeth Spenser
The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia

Starting a conversation: Regional community members’ awareness of and engagement with speech pathology
Tina Janes1, Barbra Zupan1, Tania Signal1, Megan Dalton2
1Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

A regional perspective: Mental health professionals’ awareness of speech pathology
Tina Janes1, Barbra Zupan1, Tania Signal1, Megan Dalton2
1Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Occupational therapists and acquired communication disorders: A survey of current practice in Australia (P)
Eamon Charles1, Zaneta Mok1, Natalie Berg2, Ruth Swanton2
1Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. 2Australian Catholic University, Sydney, NSW, Australia

W3D | Developing a prioritised agenda to drive speech-language pathology research within health: A panel discussion (N)
Emma Finch1,2, Elizabeth Ward2,3, Linda Worrall2, Bena Cartmill1, Petrea Cornwell4, Anne Hill2, Tania Hobson5, Tanya Rose2, Nerina Scarinci2, Kirstine Shrubsole6
1Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 2The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 3Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 4Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 5Children's Health Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. 6Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia

Background: Developing prioritised research agendas to drive health research has become a priority internationally. We currently do not know where SLPs and consumers believe gaps in the research evidence base lie. The current project is focused on developing a collaborative, prioritised agenda to drive SLP research in health according to clinical SLPs, academic SLPs and consumers of SLP services. During the panel session, the project results will be presented, and active audience feedback will be sought.

Aim(s): To develop a prioritised list of research areas requiring further research within health according to clinical SLPs, academic SLPs and consumers of SLP services. The aim of the panel session is to seek SLP input about the project results, and how to address the identified areas of need.

Method: The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) approach was used to develop prioritised research lists in the areas of service delivery and expanded scope of practice. The initial stimulus list of potential research areas to consider was based on data provided by SLPs via an online survey. One NGT session was conducted with each participant group (clinical SLPs, academic SLPs, consumers) for each of the two areas (total number of NGT sessions = 6).

Result(s): During the panel discussion the prioritised research lists will be presented for each of the areas, along with a single overarching prioritised list. Audience feedback will be sought about the lists and how to meet these areas of need.

Conclusion: SLPs and consumers have prioritised a need for more research in areas related to specific practice areas as well a broader professional issues. The next step will be to widely disseminate the prioritised research agenda and commence research projects to meet the identified areas of need.

W3E | Speech – specialised

Expert practice for children with cleft palate across the world: Application of the ICF-CY
Anna Cronin1, Sharynne McLeod1, Sarah Verdon2
1Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia. 2Charles Sturt University, Albury, NSW, Australia

Nosey speech: Training SLPs in cleft speech disorder
Akshat Shah1,2, Maeve Morrison1, Suzanne Purdy2
1Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. 2University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

What are the experiences of families of young children with cleft palate?
Anna Cronin1, Sarah Verdon2, Sharynne McLeod1
1Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia. 2Charles Sturt University, Albury, NSW, Australia

Don’t snip for speech: Speech production and tongue movements in children with tongue tie
Holly Salt, Sharon Smart, Mary Claessen
Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia

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